A Travellerspoint blog

By this Author: sarahkeebs

Laos- PDR...please don't rush

feat. Our Treehouse in Laos

sunny 25 °C

So we high-tailed it to the border, said goodbye to Thailand and crossed the Mekong River into Laos.

border boat

border boat

The official buisness didn't take too long and apart from a little panic because we thought they would only accept USD and all we have is Thai Baht to pay the visa fee. They took the Baht- it is money after all. Up 'til now we have been calculating the exchange rate as US$1 for 30 TB, now it's US$1 for 8077 Kip, that's gonna be fun.

Huay Xai

Huay Xai


soup cart guy

soup cart guy


roadside chilies

roadside chilies

The border town, Huay Xai (Hway-sigh) is dusty and perhaps a hint more primitive than the Thai equivalent. Laos is one of the 20 most impoverished nations. The little mainstreet has a sense of cheeriness somehow and people are nice enough and helpful. Our guesthouse is cozy, it was actually called Friendly Guesthouse. I chose it because the woman proprieter had such a warm smile to her, the husband was helpful too. He spent most of his day laying on the couch in the lobby smoking and watching TV really loud but loaned me his plug adapter and offered to organise our 2 day boat trip down the river to Luang Prabang. Andrew and I go walking out of the main part of town and stop in a bar-type-thing overlooking the river. We try to order coke, no dice, lemonade (sprite to all you Americans), from the menu. Ten minutes later they arrived with hot water, lemon juice and sugar but they were so nice we took it. It was not the cold refreshing beverage we'd pictured but then- it wasn't as hot anymore either. Our guy waiter had painted nails. Hmm.

sunset on the Mekong

sunset on the Mekong


Northern Laos curry

Northern Laos curry

I got to have a lovely photo session as the sun set behind the Mekong. We have dinner in the same restaurant every night we spent here and tried a few different Laos dishes. I think the best is a local green curry with sticky rice. It was really herbal and fragrant. I brought a phrasebook that covers Thai, Lao, Khmer, Vietnamese- all our destinations. I really have made an effort to learn some words in the local language but it's hard to get started. We spent a little time practicing but in the end, hello and thankyou are the most important and I genuinely think people appreciate the sentiment. I am amazed at how everyone seems to have a little English, enough for our transactions anyway.

We are in Huay Xai to do 'The Gibbon Experience', a highly recommended (by Lonely Planet) jungle adventure with treehouses and ziplines. Yahoo! It was my birthday treat, I was keen to choose a Neverland style activity to stalve off aging another year.

So we get up stupid early in the morning and prepare for a 2 hour drive into the mountains and jungle. We get some pancakes for breakfast and get our first look at some of the other people in our tour. They are all older than us but not old- good, we don't really like anyone too loud or boisterous. Turns out our ride is a pickup truck with benches in the back, a sawngthaew, nice. It was a bit blustery in the back but we got to see all the villages and people on the road so it was pretty cool, plus we forded a river and drove off-road a bit too. It reminded me of the Animal Kingdom Safari ride...a feeling I could not wait to tell my mother.

andrew

andrew

fording

fording

off road

off road

village

village

We got to the village late in the morning, just as the heat was starting to come up. There were little children spying us but keeping a distance. We were asked not to go in there like National Geopgraphic taking photos and I tried to be respectful of that. Our ordeal was about to begin. Did I say ordeal? I mean massive uphill, crazy hot, jungle hiking. I was the youngest female and skinny and to the untrained eye fit. No. I struggle to keep up with the group the whole 3 days, it was embarrassing. The guide who had to trail the group was chain smoking and probably massively frustrated with my slow progress but he never let on and even made me a walking stick. I'm telling you, it was really uphill. That's why they use the ziplines to get around otherwise you'd be walking up and down steep hillls all day. But the ziplines are at the tops of hills so you have to get there somehow. Good thing I gave up smoking or I would have died. Turns out one of the couples we were with do marathons so I feel less bad but more resentful. As we reach the outer edges of the jungle village area we get a safety brief and everyone puts on a climbing harness. Sweet.

first zip

first zip

Andrew bravely zips first so I can take pictures and even though I know he's nervous he just lets go and flies! I hear a wahoo! Clicking on and then taking off is just as I'd imagined and the primary reason for my choosing this trip. There's a loud, high-pitched metal screeching noise and the air on my face and I'm above the forest canopy and can see for miles through the hills as I reach the other tree platform. Amazing.

To be continued...

Posted by sarahkeebs 09:27 Archived in Laos Comments (0)

Buddha on tap

...and other assorted charms of central and northern Thailand

sunny 23 °C

Heading north from Bangkok.

Buddha

Buddha

Sukhothai, first capitol of Thailand, means 'Rising Happiness'.

Sawngthaew

Sawngthaew

After a 5 hour bus trip I get my first ride in a 'sawngthaew', the name translates to 2 seats and it is literally a little motor cart with 2 benches in the back- great view of the traffic behind you. We checked in at a guesthouse we chose from our LP guidebook and it was just precious. An alfresco restaurant out front, little koi ponds and potted plants and collection of bonsai trees and cute wooden furniture and our own little bungalo. Very cozy. The town it's was generally plain but quite pretty at night with the bridge all lit up and a few street food vendors.

Sukhothai bridge

Sukhothai bridge


GH Sukhothai

GH Sukhothai

We are here to get our temple on.

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lady

lady

The attraction here is the Old City of Sukhothai where there are the 750 year old ruins of a temple complex. We catch a sawngthaew toward the old city. On the way I was entertained by a few local kids. A teenaged boy and 'girl' who were friendly and spoke a little English. They were from a much smaller village and were visiting the 'big city' for some shopping and to enjoy a festival going on for Children's Day- a big national holiday in Thailand to honor the gift of children. Our lucky day, too, as all fees for attractions are waved on this day.

chedi bike

chedi bike

The atmosphere around the Wat was so joyful as well, there were families and Thai boyscouts and girlscouts playing games. We said goodbye to the lively pair when we arrived and rented ourselves a couple of bikes for the day. I hadn't ridden a bike for a decade and the traffic is total chaos but it was worth it for making it out to all the far flung sites. It's just so beautiful and amazing looking at all these elaborately decorated temples. They've been here so long and countless people have worshipped here, layed offerings at the Buddha images. People were lighting joss sticks and leaving flowers at a Buddha where people have been doing that for over 700 years and I get to be there, touch it, look into the face of the Buddha. So peaceful, so cool.

Buddha

Buddha


hand

hand


Sukhothai

Sukhothai

Chiang Mai, Chiang Rai

Another 5 hour bus journey takes us up to Chiang Mai, a small city bustling with life. There are plently of travellers here but not so much the boring old tourists on buses, more backpackers- like us. Also, it seems like a young city, there are some schools here. We met a young lady from the US studying Thai massage- where better? There is a small walled in old city with a labrynth of narrow streets surrounded by a mote and busy roads with any kind of food you could want. Guess what I wanted.

pizza

pizza

So I gave into my craving, I had a good excuse. At this point in our journey I started to suffer from some really nasty stomach cramps. We never settled into an explaination since Andrew was fine but I think I over did it on chilis extraordinarily badly. Too much of a good thing.

Remember kids, if your food is so spicy you almost faint from hyperventalation- take it easy.

Anyhoo, after plenty of rest I turned out fine. As you probably noticed I am experiencing the world through food a lot and I guess that's just a hazard I'm willing to live with.

Another encounter I had in Chiang Mai was in a dress shop. This amazing dress shop with the dressmaker in attendance. He makes these totally one of a kind pieces with naturally processed and dyed cotton- he had some silk as well but they were so beautiful I coulddn't look because of the price. He chose a dress for me- in a store full of purple and green (my favorite colors), he chose brown but it's perfect. He was so lovely any I can't wait to show off my dress.

gold

gold


white

white


reclining buddha

reclining buddha

We've visited some more gorgeous temples. We learned about how the different positions of the Buddha images represent different aspects of Buddha. When he is lying down this represents the aspect who reaches Nirvana, as this is the posture he was in when he died and therefore attained Nirvana. I came across some art students drawing the temple and they were excited to show of their work.

drawing temple

drawing temple


andrew and dragon, chiang mai

andrew and dragon, chiang mai

Another great food discovery we made are the street cart rotis. Our first and best one was in Sukhothai but we've enjoyed them all through the trip now. The lady starts with a lump of dough and spins and smacks it down to stretch it out paper thin of a greased benchtop. Then she chucks it on a hot wok and folds up bananas and egg mixture and cooks both sides and then serves it cut up and smothered in condensed milk. We can hardly walk past them!

roti

roti

Northern Thailand seems pretty laid back. The villages are small and very poor. The homes are mostly little shacks made from wood scraps and woven reeds, some are on stilts. There are veggies gardens and rice paddys and chickens running around. Maybe the people in these villages haven't got much but they seem good spirited. As we rode the bus through the countryside we got to see people going about their lives, lighting fires, bundling reeds, carrying produce, children playing and stopping to wave as we passed. I'd love a second look someday but for now, we are moving on.

Next stop Laos and our treehouse spa adventure...

Posted by sarahkeebs 08:27 Archived in Thailand Comments (0)

Hey you, where you go?

Thailand

sunny 27 °C

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Bangkok

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Just as you expected and then some.

It was a hot and sunny day when we arrived in Bangkok, less humid than Singapore but less familiar as well. Andrew and I managed to get ourselves to our guesthouse pretty easily and it was just adoreable. For $12 a night we have a clean room, firm bed, private bathroom, fridge and minibar, free wifi, and a fan. Sweet. We're in a great spot too because we can walk about 5-10 minutes to the train to get anywhere and there are loads of street vendors on the way.

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There was a lady making these sortof baked, sweet cakes right there on the sidewalk. She had a mould and a little charcoal oven thinger she cooked them on. Then there are loads of fruit stalls all set up with all sorts of fruits whole and prepared in a bag as a snack with a very special salt, sugar, chili seasoning in a packet which seems the go with every fruit. We tried one lumpy looking pear thing which turned out to be really dry and sour- but cooling. There were also some pomellos which are like giant citrus fruits with a pinky green flesh, surper thick skin and a mild flavour- the vendors actually sell them pre peeled. There are also vendors selling noodle dishes and curries in great big pots and salads and all served up in a bag! You can even get your drinks served in a bag with a rubber band and a straw, though I never figured out how. There are guys grilling up whole fish and chicken bits, and other meats, most probably pig entrails- mmmm and other popular offal on wooden skewers- I went for the chicken. There are also people all over the city serving up these fresh squeezed juice from little green skinned, oranged flesh citrus fruits- tastes like tangerines but the yummiest tangerine ever. Our first meal in Thailand? Pad Thai- it was our breakfast and dinner that night. So good. Beyond our own little market area there are all these winding narrow little lanes shooting off from the main roads called Soi, tucked in amongs the Soi is all the crazy street food. The big challenge is figuring out what they're making and how to order it because English is not so popular here. The signs are all in the beautiful and strange Thai script and everyone seems to know whats going on besides you.

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There are every manner of person riding a whole variety of scooters everywhere. Families of four, babies in tow, grandma with her shopping. They cut through and around traffic without hesitation and the whole scene at a busy intersection is enthralling- especially when watched from above on a trainstation platform. The trains are great too, cheap and frequent and with flatscreen tvs played Thai advertisments. The taxi and tuk tuk drivers are always lurking, persistant- "Hey you, where you go?" We even got the classic, "Want a ride in my airconditioned helicoptor?"

We hit the huge, modern malls for some Starbucks and IMAX. US$10 a ticket for Tron 3D at the IMAX- that's cheap. There are also streets totally packed with tables selling everything- teeshirts, lamps, lighters, wooden things, naughty things...walking down Silom Rd is an experience. There are people selling tickets to unsavoury shows and massages. A guy jumped out in front of Andrew with some gross pictures and then grinned sheepishly as I came through behind him holding his hand. I gave him my best disapproving look. Walking through here makes your personal space seem suddenly very valuable and in short supply. You don't only get fast talkers in the busy hot spots, one night we heard a line we would here again in another town as an opener to a line of bs, "I'm a teacher." Then why are you trying to tell me the town I'm visiting next is 'full' and suggesting I go somewhere to find out about another place? As if. The officials at the Vietnam Embassy weren't very much better than that. Charging us for rush job visas when we didn't ask for or need them and then refusing us multiple entries that we thought we were paying for. The experience left a sour taste in my mouth. I only hope we have as little to do with the Vietnamese beaurorcrasy as possible. Our money is good for their country, I don't know why they have to be so difficult about it. I would suggest to anyone else to make arrangments for visas through an agency and arriving by plane- the land crossing is why we had to go directly through the government agency.

We have also noticed that the Thai people seem to enjoy their fitness. One night while walking through a park we encountered a group of about a hundred all doing a group arobics workout with a guy on stage. It was so cool, I had the slightest urge to join them- they looked so springy and fun. I couldn't take a picture- it seemed wrong. Later I found I had accidentally, check it out!

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Our last day in Bagkok we took a trip up the river to the famous Kho San Rd. It lives up to it's backpacker ghetto name, dirty foreigners everywhere. There's an obvious wardrobe for people who have been a while in SEA- they tend to aquire scarves and genie pants and beer logo tees. Wonder how long it will take me. The thai fisherman pants possibilities are endless. ;) I wonder what Bangkok will look like in 6 weeks.

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Off up north to Sukhothai, Chiang Mai and Chiang Rai before we cross into Laos. Check in soon!

Posted by sarahkeebs 08:49 Archived in Thailand Comments (0)

When it rains it Singapores

Singapore chili crab is a scam and trust me on the durian

storm 28 °C

Two lessons I've picked up:

1. You most certainly do need an umbrella in the tropics- it's too hot for a waterproof jacket.

2. Durian is not palatable for most westerners and I consider myself to have adventurous taste. I heard it was gross, it smells all wrong, but I didn't listen- I had durian flavoured candy that was nice. It's like overripe, rotten mango and onions. It wasn't even the fruit that I'd had, it was the icecream- yuck. I burped up garlicy mango garbage juice smell for hours. Take my word for it. If you've never seen one- they are huge and greenish and spiky outside and have a yellowish flesh. Walk on by.

So...

Our next few days in Singapore were great. We started to eat where the locals eat in our hood and a decent curry, some veg and rice and pappadom is about $4. I started to eat where the locals were but I didn't have the guts to try eating like the locals- with their fingers. This is in an Arab area of the Little India area- different to the rest of Singapore. Someone who'd been to Asia asked if Singapore was still clean and it is very clean and orderly in most neighborhoods but Little India is a little more oldschool. More casual and the messy, uneven sidewalk is a serious contrast to the other parts- parts I had yet to see.

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I had an errand at the US Embassy which is at the end of Orchard Rd, which I have heard is the major shopping area- I had no idea what I was in for. Retail temptation I couldn't have imagined. Andrew kindly navigated us to and on the MRT (mass rapit transit). Easily mastered and oh so orderly- this is the Singapore I heard about. They have airconditioned (does the NY have ac down there yet?) and spotlessly clean underground trains that go where you need every 7 minutes. There are posters all over explaining how to be a conscientious passenger- give your seats to old ladys, no food and drink fine $500, even markings on the platform exactly where the car will stop showing how to give way to alighting passengers and board in an orderly fashion. Forced politeness- sweet. It's a $1 plus $1 deposit for the hard plastic card ticket which you stick back in the machine after you ride- no litter or waste.

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Wow- Orchard Road is indescribably fabulous!

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It's miles of store on top of store underground mall complexes and multi stories of everything and more and more and more plus holiday decorations and after Christmas sales. Phew. As we came out of the mrt it was a shock. Let me refer to my fisrt lesson here- it's totally pouring rain- hot and miserable and I'm crabby and throwing a pooty because Mr. I-don't-use-umbrellas-and-I'm-from-England maybe vaguely had something to do with why I decided not to bring one. Sorry honey. It is just stunning and gorgeous, the Gap and Tommy Hillfiger and Toys R Us and Starbucks and Dolce and Tiffanys and eveything- Even Ben and Jerry's are set up in Singapore on the Holy Strip of Shopping. We had theraputic frappucinos to stave off the heat stroke and help me shrug off my crankiness at being soggy. We walked for ages- even got lost trying to cross the road by going underground into the train station mall labrynth. It's designed to disorient, draw you in and not let you out again and we succumed then to the custard and berries brioche pizza- yum. Eventually we made it to the Embassy but it was 'half day thursday' and no one told me so oh well. Double back through the Christmas decorations all lit up at night? Yup! Kudos to my boyfriend while I stand around taking picture after picture, messing with the camera settings to try to get it right.

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10 pm haircut.

At the end of the night we did have one random encounter with a barber. Andrew's bushy blonde hairdo had been bugging him for weeks- this was the first opportunity to present itself and it was priceless...well $5. There are a couple of whorehouses on the block (our assumption for reasons) and an outdoor Buddhist Shrine where the locals hang out and socialise late. When we stopped to get this pasty white guy a haircut we piqued the interest of everyone around. There was a picture of David Beckham on the wall and I swear that's the hairdo Andrew got. The guy was chuffed as well and so lovely.

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It's downpouring again today- so much for my once-a-day afternoon storm ala Florida theory! Andrew has taken over the logistics of planning our days- I'm just too tired of it and he's so good. It's a huge relief after spending months planning and researching and booking and budgeting and turning all those gears to just go along with someone elses plan. Andrew plans a great day going to Chinatown to see some temples and hopefully get our hands on some street food and check out the night markets. First though, $5 umbrella- instant mental health.

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We get into Chinatown and go looking to the classic touristy bits but they are not ready for us yet- it's a night market. So we head back to a hawker center which is like a really intense food court. It's HUGE, there are different sections marketed of by colour and there are food stalls as far as you can see in little rows and clusters. It's chaotic, steamy, stinky, crowded and so foreign. Perfect. There are hundreds of people in here and we are the only westerners so we know we are onto a good thing. Most of the menus are photos, and we see fish heads and noodles and ducks and sausages hanging, there are stalls that just do fresh juices and pieces of fruit from apples and kiwifruit to more exotic choices like dragonfruit and sourmelon. Amongst the bedlam we weave our way aimlessly between tables and foreign sounds looking for some sign to stop and today the sign is a friendly, talkative guy. He's dealing in so authentic laksa and fishballs with ramen and we are buying in. He quizes us on ourselves, complains about the heat and get his own dinner while we dig into ours. It was really delicious. Although I mastered chopsticks when I was 8 I felt a little self conscious eating a noodle soup and slurping away in front of all the native-types but I didn't get any looks indicating that I looked rediculous. We explored a little further (read- waited out the downpour) and Andrew got his hands on some serious duck and I observed some of the locals afternoon beer rituals. They get these huge bottles of beer in big buckets of ice water and tiny little glasses and man can they put it away. The tables were overflowing and everyone as happy and relaxed and laughing.

The Buddha Tooth Relic Temple is 5 stories and built in the traditional Chinese style. It's marvelous and the inside is lush and richly decorated by ornate carvings of Buddha in various states from floor to ceiling. Being in the Temples of Buddha always fills me, I feel overhelmed with reverence. Part of me wishes to join the worshippers who have come to pray and make offerings. This is a place where I recognise a beauty I rarely see in things made by man. I am really lucky as this Temple is a busy with tourists I can really relax and take it all in because I don't feel like I'm an intruding outsider. I can even take photos without feeling badly and start to try to capture the place to share it with my friends and revisit in imagery. Upstairs in the museum I reread the story of the life of Buddha and it inspires a strong feeling in me- I can't really describe it propery but I it's powerful and energizing and I float for a while. Downstairs on my way out I quietly light up a joss stick and offer it with my gratitude for the experience. I photograph some children doing the same. Wonderful.

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We head down to the riverside, there is a lovely view of some buildings and bridges, a row of tourist trap restaurants and museums and art galleries and this is the focal point for the New Years Eve celebrations. The Asian Cultures museum is lovely and we touch on some parts of SEA which we will soon be visiting. There is a stage outside and loads of people gathering for a NYE show and there is a buzz. We find a spot on the waterfront where others seem to be trickle into and settling and after some debate about exaustion and boredom we stick it out 3 and a half hours for midnight. Hundreds or even thousands have joined us, getting their tripods set up and whipping their iphones out to capture the moment- of disappointment when we all realise the fireworks are on the other side if a building and therefore invisible. We kissed, jumped up and half heartedly dashed towards them but gave up quickly, opting to get to the MRT station before the crowds and as we rounded a corner the spectacular lightshow came into view. We watch the last minute or so and caught the first train home. Happy New Year.

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Our last, rainy day in Singapore started with paper thin prata with chocolate sauce- yum. We headed in to see the colonial area of the city and then enjoy Chinatown one last time. Firstly, in search of the 'authentic' Singapore dish, chili crab, which had eluded us thusfar we headed back to the touristy restaurants on the riverfront. $20 for a 100 grams and the crabs being 500-600g = our weekly budget in Thailand. No, and to recover from that disappointment we went into the authentic English pub, the Black Penny, and payed $23 for a redbull and a pint of Erdinger. Shock horror. We soaked up as much aircon as possible to get our moneys worth. After that lapse in judgement we headed into Chinatown. Andrew attracts taylors- why do people want to make him a suit so badly? I returned to the shop I'd bought a delicious chrysanthimum tea from a sweet gentleman the day before. After getting his next recommended tea, peppermint and honey, I got his recommendation for cheap, local, real food- back to the hawker center for his favourite Huey Fey chicken! We never found it and instead got a huge fish head with chilis and garlicy greens and had a perfect last meal in Singapore. Sat in the stinky, hot, loud, dirty food court and ordering by gestures and broken English and sharing our table with the locals. Andrew finally found his 'original American joy juice recipe', Kick-a-Poo- it's Mellow Yellow. That was a great finish to our Singapore experience which was surprising and fun and so easy going.

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I've got more pictures in my facecrack album:

http://www.facebook.com/album.php?aid=587959&id=538635057&l=d4d8300ad1..

Posted by sarahkeebs 08:08 Archived in Singapore Comments (0)

Curry and Car fumes

Our first day in Singapore

semi-overcast 30 °C

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Singapore 011edited


We finally started our trip through Southeast Asia here, in Singapore. We booked the cheapest hostel we could find online right in the heart of Little India and checked in a little after midnight. It's hot, it's humid and it smells like curry and car fumes- in a good way somehow. Our luxurius (for a closet) room has a bunk bed- at first I scoffed but really it means Andrew sleeps up top right under the freezing aircon and I have the balmy bunk below to myself. Mmmmm aircon- never been a huge fan but it's so humid it's like breathing water here. This wasn't the only litte in surprise in store for us at our accomodation. Holy toilet/showers! No really, I mean toilet - slash - showers, same cubicle for all your buisness. It's like the opposite of New Zealand where the shower and toilets are in different rooms. I still prefer it American style. At least there was toilet paper- other places I visited today kindly provided a hose instead...yeah right.

A little bit about Singapore. It's a city, island, country off the southern tip of Malaysia. The population is a diverse 4.8 million. English is widely spoken as well as Mandarin, Malay and Tamil (Singaporean Indian from south India). The main religions are Buddhism, Islam and Christianity. The currency is the S$ Singapore dollar which is worth about $.85 US$ and the economy is strong and growing- raking in US$85 billion a year. The airport is a major hub, many flights between Australia, Asia, and Europe stop here. The city is a hectic mixture of old and new, colonial and modern.
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Andrew and I kicked off our day in search of 'the best laksa in Singapore' according to our Lonely Planet and walked in circles before we gave up. There is a great looking food court right next to the hostel with places serving all sorts of exciting foods from fresh squeezed sugar cane, yum, to turtle and black chicken- maybe tomorrow. We had some really great Chinese including delish sweet and sour beancurd and black bean pork. I am mostly enthralled with all the exciting beverage choices- my favourite treat today was sour plum and lime ice, which would make a stellar margarita. The sour plums are actually salt cured shrived up plum and they were mouthwatering and a real sensation with the lime ice. We also enjoyed some Slurpies from 7-11, I just can't resist, and lots of iced tea- grass jelly, jasmine green, oolong. I was dying to know what was so special about those little gold redbulls- they're flat, that's right, sans carbonation.

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Singapore 055_1024

We visited 3 Temples, all along the same stretch of road there was a Temple for Vishnu, a Thai styled Sakya Muni Buddha, and a Temple for Guayn Yin (Chinese Goddess of Mercy) as well as Buddha.
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Singapore 026_1024

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Singapore 028_1024

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Singapore 031_1024

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Singapore 032_1024

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They are all so beautiful and peaceful. Devoutees filtered in and out kneeling and making offerings of incense, oil, flowers, fruit, milk- Starbucks frappacino...! I hope to be able to photograph more temples in our travels but something seemed wrong about disturbing the quiet prayer in the temples today. We will visit some more historic areas tomorrow including the colonial district and some museums later in the week.

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Singapore 034_1024

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Singapore 038_1024

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Singapore 048_1024

Little India

Little India

After our well-timed nap during the 4-5 pm downpour (ala Florida) we headed out to put a flavour to the neighborhood. Our choice was Banana Leaf Apolo. Look Ma- no plates!
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Singapore 073_1024

They place a banana leaf on the table in front of you which you eat off of- cute. I had a mutton biryani and Andrew had Kadai chicken. The curry was perfect and the gimmick entertaining- tomorrow we are aiming for cheap street food and pushing the envelope. Walking around as it gets dark is great, the colourful colonial detailed architecture gives way to curvy, narrow streets lined with lit up shop signs. No. 1`Internet Store and Cheapest Shop in Singapore, 3 for $10- quality assured!

Singapore is definately for worshippers of the retail gods. There seem to be malls everywhere- airconditioned oasis. Tomorrow- Orchard Road, it's like 5th Ave for SEA. The American Embassy- seems my passport is full and I need more pages, it would be impressive if the NZ visas weren't a whole page each. Otherwise, who knows? Anything can happen.

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Singapore 015_1024


Does anyone remember this American recipe?

Posted by sarahkeebs 11:05 Archived in Singapore Comments (0)

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